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7 Types of Logos (and What's Best for Your Business)



A logo is an image that symbolizes your business. But did you know there are 7 different types of logos?


Though they’re all a combination of typography and images, each type of logo gives your brand a different feel. And since your logo is the first thing new customers will see, you want to make sure you get it right. Want to choose the best logo type for your business? Here are the 7 types of logos you need to know about:


 
1. Monogram Logos (or lettermarks)

Monogram logos or lettermarks are logos that consist of letters, usually brand initials. IBM, CNN, HP, HBO . . . They’re the initialisms of a few famous businesses with rather lengthy names. With 2 or 3 words to remember, they’ve each turned to using their initials for brand-identification purposes. So it makes perfect sense for them to use monograms—sometimes called lettermark logos—to represent their organizations.


A lettermark is a typography-based logo that’s comprised of a few letters, usually a company’s initials. The lettermark is all about simplicity. By utilizing just a few letters lettermark logos are effective at streamlining any company brand if they have a long name. For example, how much easier is it to say—and remember—NASA versus the National Aeronautics and Space Administration?


If you're not an established business, you may want to add your full business name below the monogram. Also, make sure the monogram doesn't spell or "say" something that you didn't intend! Be sure to sound it out.


Because the focus is on initials, the font you choose (or create) is very important to make sure your logo is not only on-theme with what your company does, but also legible when you print on business cards. Also, if you’re not an established business already you may want to add your full business name below the logo so people can begin to learn who you are right away.


When to use a monogram logo for your business:

  • If your business has a rather lengthy name, with more than 2 or 3 words to remember, consider using the initials as your brand mark.

  • If you want to re-brand aesthetically without changing your company name, a monogram logo can be a good option.



2. Wordmarks (or logotypes)

Similar to a lettermark, a wordmark or logotype is a font-based logo that focuses on a business’ name alone. Think Visa and Coca-Cola. Wordmark logos work really well when a company has a distinct name. Google’s logo is a great example of this. The name itself is catchy and memorable so, when combined with strong typography, the logo helps create strong brand recognition.


The style of a font can convey the essence of what your business does, represents or stands for. Font style can convey fun, seriousness, relaxation, elegance, luxuriousness, dependability, security, exclusivity, wildness, wisdom, intelligence . . . the list goes on and on. Choose wisely!


Also, like with a lettermark logo, typography will be an important decision. Since the focus will be on your name, you’ll want to pick a font—or create a font—that captures the essence of what your business does. For example, fashion labels tend to use clean, elegant fonts that feel high-end, while legal or government agencies almost always stick to traditional, “heavier” text that feels secure.


When to use a letter or wordmark logo for your business:

  • Consider a lettermark logo if your business happens to have a long name. Condensing the business name into initials will help simplify your design and likewise customers will have an easier time recalling your business and your logo.

  • A wordmark is a good decision if you’re a new business and need to get your name out there, just make sure that name is short enough to take advantage of the design. Anything too long can look cluttered.

  • A wordmark logo is a good idea if you have a distinct business name that will stick in customers’ minds. Having your name in a great, designed font will make your brand all the stickier.

  • Both lettermark and wordmark logos are easy to replicate across marketing material and branding thus making them highly adaptable options for a new, and developing, business.

  • Remember that you’ll want to be scrupulous when creating a lettermark or a wordmark. Your business name in a font alone likely won’t be distinct enough to capture the nuance of your brand. So make sure you hire a professional who’ll have an eye for detail.



3. Pictorial Marks (or logo symbols)